Biosafety Agreement

Biosafety Agreement

A number of agreements within the framework of the World Trade Organization (WTO), such as the Agreement on the Application of Health and Plant Health Measures (SPS) and the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement (TBT) and the Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement, contain provisions relevant to the protocol. This protocol states in its preamble that the parties must address these concerns at the national and international levels and requires an effective policy and regulatory framework for research and production, known as a common «biosecurity» agreement; importing, exporting and transiting; Environmental release, human consumption standards of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and IPRs of developed innovations. The framework should also encourage investment by local and foreign investors in this area. The Cartagena Biosecurity Protocol, also known as the Biosecurity Protocol, was adopted in January 2000 following the 6th session of an ad hoc CBD biosecurity working group between July 1996 and February 1999. The working group presented a draft protocol that was submitted to the Conference of the Parties for consideration at its first special session, which was specifically convened for the adoption of a CBD biosecurity protocol. After some delays, the Cartagena protocol was finally adopted on 29 January 2000. The Biosecurity Protocol aims to protect biodiversity from the potential risks associated with modified living organisms from modern biotechnology. [6] Modern biotechnology can help the global coalition against hunger and malnutrition. The global area of transgenic plants reached 134 million hectares by the end of 2009 and is expected to reach nearly 150 million hectares by 2010. Despite the benefits of modern biotechnology, concerns have been expressed about the proper and safe application of this efficient instrument for food production and environmental release of modified living organisms (LVO).

These include concerns about consumer safety (39), animal health, reduced agricultural biodiversity, pollution, loss of biodiversity and social, economic and ethical concerns. concerns about the commercial/ecological liberation of VO have been raised by scientific/social debates at the level of governments and international treaties and agreements, drafts of several international instruments such as the Cartagena Protocol on Biosecurity (CPB), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CDB), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Commission the International Standard Organization (ISO), the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the GATT Trade Defence Agreement (WTO) and the GATT Trade Defence Agreement (The Protocol promotes biotech risk prevention by establishing rules and procedures for the safe transmission, handling and use of LVO, with a focus on cross-border transfers of LVO.