Inuvialuit-Inupiat Polar Bear Management Agreement

Inuvialuit-Inupiat Polar Bear Management Agreement

State veterinarians in the United States recommend that meat from animals with telazole put on medication® is safe to consume within 14-30 days after appeasement. In Alaska, veterinarians recommend that brown and black bear meat be eaten safely after 14 days. The 14-day wait for a previously immobilized polar bear with telazole is considered by many veterinarians to be a conservative estimate. A polar bear study has shown that telazole® (tiletamine-zolazepam), the drug intended to immobilize polar bears, degrades rapidly in polar bears, with most drug residues disappearing from tissue within 24 hours. Some telazole degradation products (also known as «metabolites») remain at a low level after this period. These metabolites decrease rapidly after immobilization and are unlikely to have clinical effects in humans who eat hunted meat or bear fats, but some metabolites were found at very low concentrations 11 days after immobilization (that was when the study ended). The Inuvialuit Game Council was created by Inuvialuit`s final agreement «to represent the collective interest of the inuvialuit for wild animals» (IFA, s.14,74). This concerns regional, national and international representation. On behalf of the Inuvialuit, the Council appoints representatives to all national co-boards of directors of polar bears with partial populations within the Inuvialuit region (SRI). The IGC also appoints Inuvialuit members to Canadian and Inuit delegations to international for a and, importantly, the Government of Canada «reviews and advises on any internationally proposed wildlife positions in the Inuvialuit Incubation Region» (IFA, s.14.74).

(e)) including polar bears. Kanayurak, N.L. 2016. A case study on polar bear co-management in Alaska. Master of Marine Affairs Thesis, University of Washington, Seattle, AV. 84 S. Peacock, E., et al. 2015. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic. PLoS ONE 10 (1): e112021. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112021.



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